red-lipstick:

Volvulent

(Source: volvulent)

glenweldon:

SUPERMAN FAMILY #196. July-August 1979. “Super-Disco Fever!” Written by Cary Burkett, Penciled by Kurt Schaffenberger, Inked by Dan Adkins.

Clark Kent is taken to a discotheque by his fan club and discovers that a madman has hidden several bombs beneath the dance floor.

He slyly uses his super-powers to disarm each one, using only the raw propulsive musk-scented power of … his moves.

(“Shake your bootie?”)

(via neoliberalismkills)

maghrabiyya:

the-goddamazon:

fuckyeahbiguys:

"I’m sick of how bisexuality is erased in LGBT spaces. I get really nervous before any LGBT event, especially Pride. I feel incredibly sad and hopeless when gay and lesbian people call me insulting names. If gay and lesbian people don’t understand me – Continue reading Prejudice at Pride at Empathize This

This just punched me in the heart.

:(

(via occupiedmuslim)

(Source: eccentricnoir, via bradei)

feminism5ever:

When people say “culture is meant to be shared” I’m literally like ???? Because that has literally never been the purpose of any culture. Culture is about identity, community and family. It’s about tradition. It is not and has never been about “sharing”.

(via bradei)

diabloorganics:

Diablo Organics Megalodon Teeth Ear Weights for the girls and guys with stretched ears.

(via oneyedjoker)

being a psych major is very expensive…

sex-and-metaphors:

thisisnotlatino:

bad-dominicana:

youre asking the wrong questions. youre using nondominican context to define us and NOPE.
dominicans will say no to “black” but ive always been referred to in my country as morena or negra. both those terms to us equate to “person of darker skin and more afrodescendant features”.
im often described back home as morenita pelo malo. and no dominican will disagree. in our context that means afro haired woman of afro descent.

so stop. and stfu. we dont have to i.d. as anything comfy to you as outsider. we have our own context as per our language and history. you dont have to understand it. bye.

Exactly!! You cannot use American terminology and racial forms of identification and force them on other people and get upset when they understand. To MANY latinx people, even Afro Latinxs, ‘black’ means African American.

-m

idk… Now, this is a conversation we have a lot in Puerto Rico as well. The thing is, the reason some Dominicans and Puerto Ricans look black  is because of the slave trade passing through the Caribbean and the subsequent intermingling within the indigenous and Spanish populations. So, basically, because we have African roots. While I completely agree that it’s up to the individual to decide how they would like to identify, I think it’s also really important to examine why Latinx people tend to be so hesitant to identify as black.

You really can’t deny the pervasive culture of racism in both countries and the tendency for Latinx people, especially w/in the family setting, to tell us to “marry light skinned” and “purify the race”. At least in PR, this stems, in part, from an attempt to white wash the population by the US in the 1950’s (I’ll look for the link asap) and now, the want of many people on the island to assimilate with the US. I would say I’m white passing, at least most of the time, so this isn’t an issue I struggle with personally but it’s something I see a lot of friends and family struggle with.

One’s identity is wholly their own and it’s entirely for one to examine and come to a conclusion. It’s just, in discussions like these, and in cultures like the ones we come from, the pervasive nature of anti-blackness is one that is very real and often ignored. I also understand that many people identify “black” with “African American" but that’s not really what it means. To my understanding, it simply refers to an individual with darker skin/afrodescendent features, to use OP’s phrasing. As I mentioned though, it’s not something I personally struggle with so feel free to ignore me.